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20130109
20130109
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
to have whether it's debt ceiling raising taxes payroll taxes, that it is really a kind of -- both an ethical and economic question. >> john: whoever has the $3 trillion coin, they'll suggest that he gets the tax cut. president obama has said he will not negotiate with republicans over raising the debt ceiling. and yet they say that he's going to have to and they're going to make commands on him if he wants to raise it. are liberals going to say that obama is caving way too soon? >> he's already caved. already by allowing this to go to another day, that was a cave-in. we've heard him say how many times he won't negotiate with republicans. i love this idea. and i think you know, people are saying it is crazy but the other side what they're going to do is very, very crazy. but the president doesn't like to do things like this. and i can't see him actually doing it. >> john: going big? >> i can't see it happening. >> john: let's move on to another fight the president is about to face, the nomination of chuck hagel former republican senator from nebraska, for secretary of defense. rick
as we approach this battle over spending cuts with regard to the debt ceiling we know that jack lew has been sympathetic, supportive of president and his agenda, supporting entitlements, supporting spending and what not. so what's your take whether or not we'll get meaningful spending cuts with a treasury secretary like jack lew? >> well, i think when you look at jack lew's background and compare him to say tim geithner, the present treasury secretary what you see is a couple things. one, this is a guy who knows capitol hill very well. he has spent a lot of years on the congressional staff. all of it working for democrats. he worked for tip o'neill. he worked for joe moakly. unlike tim geithner who never worked on capitol hill he has a sense how to get deals done in congress. secondly he comes from the liberal wing of the democratic party. i talked to him when i worked on my book about the budget, red ink, last year. he believes in the power of government. he is not going to be very sympatico with people like paul ryan who believe the whole role of the budget exercise is to shrink the g
that this deadline, the debt ceiling may be reached by february 15th. basically 40% of spending gets cut off. and the treasury is going to have to make decisions about whether to pay social security checks or tax refunds or paying our soldiers or paying the fbi. these are choices that now becoming a little bit more real and i don't think there's anybody in the republicans -- well, there are a few but most people know this would be nuts. >> this is why congress is less popular now than getting simultaneous root canals ands colonoscopies and listening to nickelback. >> stephanie: not talking about you. >> i certainly hope not. >> stephanie: how does this play out? the exact same way? will it be 11th hour again? >> well, that wouldn't surprise me a bit. but the 11th hour is kind of -- not as precise as what it was with december 31st and january 1st. it is an estimate that it is february 15th. we won't know exactly. at some point if they get the printing press warmed up for the platinum coin -- >> stephanie: which, by the way, you should be on. absolutely. >> that would be one for the record boo
, in the context of that dialogue and the need to raise the debt ceiling and the focus now on spending cuts, it will be interesting over the next few weeks to see were corporate tax reform falls out on that conversation. >> i made my way over here. >> david. can you tell us what is your top legislative priority this year? >> we have a lot of priorities. as i mentioned in the earlier comments, the first one is to encourage government and policymakers to do no harm. if we look at the game changing opportunities occurring in the energy area, it is truly revolutionary. so our first council of look to our priority is to say don't do anything that would discourage that investment and economic activity. so when we look at priorities, we first look at issues like regulatory regimes. we look to the congress and say, what else can we do to open up other areas for access? we're not talking about national parks. we're not talking about sensitive areas. we're talking about areas that have potential for vast oil and natural gas development. where the industry would be prepared to invest billions of dolla
the debt ceiling. >> it is congress' responsibility to ensure that the bills congress racked up are paid. >> reporter: just one of several looming showdowns as the president prepares to kick off his second term. >> what you're seeing is a more aggressive barack obama, someone who is looking more at polishing what his place in history will be, the mark he wants to leave on the country in the next four years. and that, in some ways, means a more contentious relationship with congress. >> reporter: and some serious people, matt, are floating an idea to try to avoid that debt ceiling crisis, proposing that the treasury department mint a platinum trillion dollar coin. you would put that coin away in the federal reserve and then if necessary, you would spend it to help pay off the money that the u.s. owes. if that did happen, an idea some would call ridridiculous, you wd hate to be the person to put that coin in the million dollar meter. >> not a good thing, peter. thank you. >>> new jersey governor chris christie made some headlines recently when he called out gop republicans for postponing a
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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